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Author Topic: A possible combination of Open Source systems  (Read 574 times)

PeterC

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A possible combination of Open Source systems
« on: 23 February 2016, 03:04:22 »
I am finding it somewhat confusing and difficult to understand all the different mapping acronyms and concepts. However I can see that there is a lot of potentially useful free software available in the Open Source world for one-placers. Ideally there would be an integrated suite of systems (or 'stack') that has been put together to make it all work seamlessly and easily for us, without getting into too much technicalities.

If there isn't, and we choose to go the OSGEO way, picking out the most appropriate elements and getting them to work together will be a huge challenge, especially if we want non-technical people to use them.

As someone with some technical ability, my current understanding and choice of OSGEO systems is:
  • QGIS - "create, edit, visualise, analyse and publish geospatial information" (on a desktop)
  • GeoServer - "a platform for publishing spatial data and interactive mapping applications to the web" (on a website)
  • OpenLayers - "a high-performance, feature-packed library for all your mapping needs" (on a website)
In simple terms I think the way these would work together, for any of us who wanted to use them, is:
  • we each use QGIS on a desktop to pull together and create whatever maps we want, made up of whatever (raster and vector) layers we want, and incorporating any desired attributes within the vector layers
  • we (somehow) transfer these maps and layers into a GeoServer environment, and make them available (using an interface called WMS-T)
  • we each have OpenLayers on our own websites and put maps where we want them, with the functionality we want, that are pulled from the MapServer as required - see for example this WMS Time Example
One of the beauties of the standards is that if anyone wanted to use different tools for any part of this they can, and they should be able to integrate them.

See OSGEO basic information for other OSGEO possibilities. Note that when this post was first published it referred to MapServer rather than GeoServer (they are similar but GeoServer offers better features for our use).

Note that OpenGeo Suite is a pre-packaged version of these components, with some extra bits and the possibility of commercial support. Initially we started looking at OpenGeo Suite but decided to install the individual components instead.
« Last Edit: 9 April 2016, 07:05:24 by PeterC »

dmpalmer

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Re: A possible combination of Open Source systems
« Reply #1 on: 17 January 2017, 17:03:26 »
I am contemplating using QGIS at home. I have a book entitled Desktop GIS: Mapping the Planet with Open Source Tools by Gary E. Sherman. It looks very technical and although I am an IT professional it is rather daunting. It concentrates on QGIS, Grass and PostGIS. The mapping terminology is another hurdle to vault.

I am a volunteer on the Know Your Place project which is based in Bristol. We are currently adding Tithe maps for Somerset, Wiltshire and Gloucestershire. I am fairly sure that the project uses QGIS.

The KYP site is worth looking at to see what is possible given the resources.

We start off by photographing the tithe maps with a special rig and hi-res camera.
These images are then distributed to volunteers who crop the images to the parish boundaries.
The images are then loaded onto the server like a jigsaw puzzle.
Other volunteers then use special software to Geolocate points on the maps that is to tell the server that point A on the tithe map equates to point B on the current OS map. When enough points are identified, the software can stretch the tithe map to fit the OS map and apresto you can compare the two maps (and others) online via the website.

PeterC

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Re: A possible combination of Open Source systems
« Reply #2 on: 18 January 2017, 06:25:36 »
Welcome to the Mapping for One-Place Studies forum. I do love the Know Your Place (Bristol) initiative.

Some aspects of KYP helped inspire me when developing the M4OPS prototype. (By the way if anyone would like to see their One-Place Study mapped within M4OPS, with my help, then please contact me (Peter) as I am looking for more volunteers).

On QGIS I think it is amazing for free software. I have got to grips with it myself just enough to find it very useful especially for Georeferencing (Geolocating), but I cannot claim to be an expert. There are useful training resources etc, and lots of helpful people out there in the QGIS community.

 

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